Lindsey Williams – The Energy Non-Crisis – Chapter 17

Chapter 17: If Gull Island Didn’t Blow Your Mind—This Will!

Gull Island just proved what the oil companies have believed for some time. It authenticated the seismographic findings. Seismographic testing has indicated that there is as much crude oil on the North Slope of Alaska as in Saudi Arabia. Since the Gull Island find proved to be seismographically correct, then the other testings are correct also. There are many hundreds of square miles of oil under the North Slope of Alaska.

To clarify what I am about to say, let me first re-emphasize that the government permitted the oil companies to drill and prove many sites (subsequently making them cap the wells and keep secret the proof of the finds), but they do not allow them to produce from the wells. This is why I have referred (below) to a number of wells having been drilled (after I left the North Slope). The only production permitted is from the small area of the North Slope.

Gull Island is located five miles off shore from Prudhoe Bay. It is in the Beaufort Sea.

The chemical structure of the oil at Gull Island is different from that of the oil in the Prudhoe Bay field and the pressure of the field is different, proving that it is a totally different pool of oil from that at Prudhoe Bay.

The Gull Island burn produced 30,000 barrels of oil per day through a 31/2 inch pipe at 900 feet.

Three wells have been drilled, proven, and capped at Gull Island. The East Dock well also hit the Gull Island oil pool (you can tell by the chemical structure). For forty miles to the east of Gull Island, there has not been a single dry hole drilled, although many wells have been drilled. This shows the immensity of the size of the field.

The Gull Island oil find is even larger than the Prudhoe Bay field, which is presently producing more than two million barrels of oil every twenty-four hours.

Where is the energy crisis? It surely is not on the North Slope of Alaska, so it must be only in Washington, D.C.!

Now—just in case Gull Island didn’t blow your mind, try this on for size! Only recently, just west of Gull Island, the Kuparuk oil field has been drilled.

Again, this is a totally separate pool of oil from either the Prudhoe Bay field or the Gull Island field. The chemical make up of the field and the pressure of the field is different from the others, proving it to be a totally separate pool of oil.

In an entirely different area of the North Slope than the 100-square-mile area of the Prudhoe Bay field, the Kuparuk field is approximately 60 miles long by 30 miles wide and contains approximately the same amount of oil as the Prudhoe Bay field.

The oil in the Kuparuk field is at a 6,000-foot depth and there is 300 feet of oil sand. The field pressure is 900 lbs. at well head, and test wells have flowed at 900 barrels a day at normal flow pressure.

It is projected that 800 to 1,400 wells will be drilled into the Kuparuk field.

From 1973 through 1980 we were being told continually that America was in the midst of a major energy crisis, yet no oil production was allowed from the Kuparuk field. It wasn’t until 1981 that permission was finally granted for production. Why the delay—if there really was a crisis?

The reason Mr. X made the statement that there is as much crude oil on the North Slope of Alaska as in all of Saudi Arabia is because the oil companies have drilled all over the North Slope and have proven that there is as much oil there, but still they are only allowed to produce from the small area.

The North Slope is everything in Alaska North of the Brooks Mountains. Prudhoe Bay is a very small portion of this enormous area (just remember the size of Alaska, as we illustrated earlier in the book).

After the first edition of this book was printed, many people requested additional technical data. This added chapter is a result of those requests.

As I was dictating this additional material, I had the opportunity of being with a gentleman who is a speculator in oil leases. He made the statement to me as he looked over the oath I was making public, that every oil speculator in America who is interested in Alaskan oil leases should get a copy of this, because he had never seen such pertinent information in print before. So what you have just read will excite many oil speculators and cause them to search the maps and watch for the latest leases.

Possibly you, have heard it stated that the Alaskan crude oil has such a high sulphur content that it cannot be refined by most oil refineries in the U.S. We are being told that this is the reason why the Alaskan oil is not helping to solve America’s energy crisis. This is also the excuse that is being used for shipping Alaskan crude oil to other countries. It has also been reported that major power companies are even telling this to their customers (in their monthly statement inserts), using it to justify their need for rate increases.

Well, here is a statistic that should silence those false claims and blow the lid off of that phony excuse of too much sulphur in the Alaskan crude. An August 11, 1980, analysis of the Prudhoe Bay crude oil, which is flowing in the Trans-Alaska Oil Pipeline, reads as follows:

Sulphur content – 0.9%
Flash point of the oil – 35 °F
Wax content – 6%
Asphalt content – 2%
Crude oil freeze temperature (better known as pour point) – 15 °F

The sulphur content of the Prudhoe Bay Alaskan oil is low in comparison to oil from other sources in the U.S., as well as many foreign oils.

The Alaskan Prudhoe Bay oil can be refined by any major refinery in America without damage to the ecology.

This means, then, that the widely publicized excuse of too high a sulphur content is simply not true. Therefore, it is just one more link in the long chain of falsehoods that we are asked to believe as Americans.

An energy crisis??????

More Recent Facts – A Comparison

The following is a comparison between the three oil fields on the North Slope of Alaska which have been drilled into with numerous wells, tested, and proven. Prudhoe Bay can produce two (2) million barrels of oil every 24 hours for 20 to 40 years at artesian pressure. Imagine what the production of the Kuparuk and Gull Island fields could be.

Field: Prudhoe – Pay Zone Oil (Average depth of oil pool): 600ft. of pay zone – Area of Field: 100 square miles

Field: Kuparuk – Pay Zone Oil (Average depth of oil pool): 300ft. of pay zone – Area of Field: Twice the size of Prudhoe

Field: Gull Island – Pay Zone Oil (Average depth of oil pool): 1,200ft. of pay zone – Area of Field: At least four times the size of Prudhoe… Estimates are that it is the richest oil field on the face of the earth.

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